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Press Release

MGIC Investment Corporation Reports Second Quarter 2021 Results

Aug 4, 2021
Second Quarter 2021 Net Income of $153.1 million or $0.44 per Diluted Share
Second Quarter 2021 Adjusted Net Operating Income (Non-GAAP) of $151.5 million or $0.44 per Diluted Share

MILWAUKEE, Aug. 4, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- MGIC Investment Corporation (NYSE: MTG) today reported operating and financial results for the second quarter of 2021. Net income for the quarter was $153.1 million, or $0.44 per diluted share, compared with net income of $14.0 million, or $0.04 per diluted share, for the second quarter of 2020.

Adjusted net operating income for the second quarter of 2021 was $151.5 million, or $0.44 per diluted share, compared with $9.9 million, or $0.03 per diluted share, for the second quarter of 2020. We present the non-GAAP financial measure "Adjusted net operating income" to increase the comparability between periods of our financial results. See "Use of Non-GAAP financial measures" below.

Tim Mattke, CEO of MTG and Mortgage Guaranty Insurance Corporation ("MGIC"), said, "I am pleased to report that we delivered another quarter of strong financial performance. Our quarterly financial results benefited from the credit quality of our insurance in force, a strong housing market, a decreasing number of new delinquencies, and improving economic conditions as many local economies return to pre-pandemic levels of activity. Given our strong capital base and market position I am excited about our ability to provide credit enhancement and low down payment solutions to lenders, GSEs and borrowers, and to deliver meaningful returns to our shareholders."

Mattke further stated, "Reflecting the increase in our capital position, and long-term confidence in our transformed business model a $150 million dividend was declared and paid from MGIC to our holding company subsequent to quarter end.  The dividend payment to the holding company enhances the liquidity of the holding company and positions us to create long-term shareholder value by retiring debt, paying dividends, repurchasing stock,  or pursuing new business opportunities.  The holding company Board also authorized a 33% increase in the quarterly common stock dividend to be paid on August 26, 2021."

Second Quarter Summary

  • New insurance written was $33.6 billion, compared to $30.8 billion the first quarter of 2021 and $28.2 billion in the second quarter of 2020, reflecting the strength of the purchase mortgage market and our position in the market. 
  • Persistency, or the percentage of insurance remaining in force from one year prior, was 57.1% at June 30, 2021, compared with 56.2% at March 31, 2021 and 68.2% at June 30, 2020.
  • Insurance in force (IIF) of $262.0 billion at June 30, 2021 increased by 4.1% during the quarter and 13.7% compared to June 30, 2020.
  • Primary delinquency inventory of 42,999  loans at June 30, 2021 decreased from 52,775 loans at March 31, 2021, and 69,326 loans at June 30, 2020, which was the peak of our COVID-19 pandemic delinquencies.
    • As of June 30, 2021,  55% of the loans in our delinquency inventory were reported to us as subject to forbearance plans. We believe substantially all of the reported forbearance plans are COVID-19 related.
    • The percentage of loans insured with primary insurance that were delinquent at June 30, 2021 was 3.71%, compared to 4.65% at March 31, 2021, and 6.35% at June 30, 2020
  • The loss ratio for the second quarter of 2021 was 11.6%, compared to 15.5% for the first quarter of 2021 and 89.2% for the second quarter of 2020.
  • The underwriting expense ratio associated with our insurance operations for the second quarter of 2021 was 22.3%, compared to 19.8% for the first quarter of 2021 and 20.1% for the second quarter of 2020.
  • Net premium yield was 39.1 basis points in the second quarter of 2021, compared to 40.9 basis points for the first quarter of 2021 and 42.7 basis points for the second quarter of 2020.
  • MGIC Investment Corporation paid a $0.06 dividend per common share to shareholders during the second quarter of 2021.
  • Book value per common share outstanding increased by 4.3% from December 31, 2020 to $14.48 and increased by 11.8% from June 30, 2020.  (June 30, 2021 book value per common share outstanding includes $0.66  in net unrealized gain on securities, compared to $0.80 at December 31, 2020 and $0.62 at June 30, 2020).

_______________

Third Quarter 2021 Activities

  • $265.8 billion of IIF at July  31, 2021, compared to $262.0 billion of IIF at June 30, 2021.
  • 3,356 notices of delinquency received in July 2021, compared to 3,229 notices of delinquency received in June 2021 and 3,016 notices of delinquency received in May 2021.
  • 4,834 cures reported in July 2021, compared to 5,207 cures reported in June 2021 and 5,638 cures reported in May 2021.
  • 41,411  loans in delinquency inventory at July 31, 2021, compared to 42,999 loans in delinquency inventory at June 30, 2021 and 45,101 loans in delinquency inventory at May 31, 2021.
  • Given the decreasing impact of COVID-19 on the Company's operating statistics, the Company will no longer report operating statistics on a monthly basis.
  • MGIC Investment Corporation declared a dividend of $0.08 per common share to shareholders.
  • MGIC paid a $150 million dividend to MGIC Investment Corporation
  • In August 2021, MGIC entered into a $398.4 million excess of loss reinsurance agreement (executed through an insurance linked note transaction) that covers the vast majority of policies issued from January 1, 2021 through May 28, 2021.

Revenues

Total revenues for the second quarter of 2021 were $297.9 million, compared to $294.0 million in the second quarter last year. The increase  reflects higher premiums earned and higher net investment income. Net premiums written for the quarter were $241.7 million, compared to $221.4 million for the same period last year. Net premiums earned for the quarter were $251.5 million, compared to $243.6 million for the same period last year. The increase in net premium written was due to an increase in insurance inforce and an increase in profit commission, partially offset by a decrease in the premium yield.  Profit commission was lower in the second quarter of 2020 due to higher ceded incurred losses resulting from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.   The effects on net premiums earned of the increase in net premiums written was partially offset by  a decrease in accelerated premiums earned from single premium policy cancellations due to a decrease in refinance activity.  Investment income for the second quarter increased to $41.1 million, from $39.7  million for the same period last year, resulting from an increase in the consolidated investment portfolio partially offset by lower investment yields.

Losses and expenses

Losses incurred 

Net losses incurred were $29.2 million, compared to $217.4 million in the same period last year. In the second quarter of 2021, our re-estimation of reserves on previous delinquencies resulted in insignificant loss development compared to $10 million of adverse loss reserve development in the second quarter of 2020.  In the second quarter of 2021, we also increased our incurred but not reported, or IBNR, reserve from $24 million to $28 million compared to an increase of $31 million in the second quarter of 2020. 

Underwriting and other expenses

Net underwriting and other expenses were $56.8 million in the second quarter of 2021, compared to $47.2 million in the same period last year primarily due to increases in professional and consulting services related to our investments in infrastructure.  This was partially offset by decreases in employee compensation costs.

Interest Expense

Interest expense was $18.0 million in the second quarter of 2021, compared to $12.9 million in the same period last year.  The increase is due to the August 2020 issuance of our 5.25% Senior Notes, partially offset by the repurchase of a portion of our 5.75% Senior Notes and 9% Convertible Junior Debentures.

Provision for income taxes

The effective income tax rate was 21.1% in the second quarter of 2021 and 14.8% in the second quarter of 2020.  The effective tax rate in the second quarter of 2020 reflects an underwriting loss that was offset by investment income, a portion of which was from tax preferenced securities.

Capital

  • Total consolidated shareholders' equity was $4.9 billion as of June 30, 2021, compared to $4.7 billion as of December 31, 2020 and $4.4 billion as of June 30, 2020.
  • MGIC's PMIERs Available Assets totaled $5.7 billion, or $2.3 billion above its Minimum Required Assets as of June 30, 2021.

Other Balance Sheet and Liquidity Metrics

  • Total consolidated assets were $7.6 billion as of June 30, 2021, compared to $7.4 billion as of December 31, 2020, and $6.6 billion as of June 30, 2020.
  • The fair value of our consolidated investment portfolio, cash and cash equivalents was $7.2 billion as of June 30, 2021, compared to $7.0 billion as of December 31, 2020, and $6.2 billion as of June 30, 2020.
  • The fair value of investments, cash and cash equivalents at the holding company was $772 million as of June 30, 2021, compared to $847 million as of December 31, 2020, and $530 million as of June 30, 2020.
  • Total consolidated debt as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 was $1.2 billion, compared to $833 million as of June 30, 2020.

Conference Call and Webcast Details

MGIC Investment Corporation will hold a conference call August 5, 2021, at 10 a.m. ET to allow securities analysts and shareholders the opportunity to hear management discuss the company's quarterly results. The conference call number is 1-866-834-4126. The call is being webcast and can be accessed at the company's website at http://mtg.mgic.com/. A replay of the webcast will be available on the company's website through September 5, 2021 under "Newsroom."

About MGIC

MGIC (www.mgic.com), the principal subsidiary of MGIC Investment Corporation, serves lenders throughout the United States, Puerto Rico, and other locations helping families achieve homeownership sooner by making affordable low-down-payment mortgages a reality. At June 30, 2021, MGIC had $262.0 billion of primary insurance in force covering more than 1.1 million mortgages.

This press release, which includes certain additional statistical and other information, including non-GAAP financial information and a supplement that contains various portfolio statistics, are all available on the Company's website at https://mtg.mgic.com/ under "Newsroom."

From time to time MGIC Investment Corporation releases important information via postings on its corporate website, and via postings on MGIC's website for information related to underwriting and pricing, and intends to continue to do so in the future. Such postings include corrections of previous disclosures, and may be made without any other disclosure. Investors and other interested parties are encouraged to enroll to receive automatic email alerts and Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds regarding new postings. Enrollment information for MGIC Investment Corporation alerts can be found at https://mtg.mgic.com/shareholder-services/email-alerts. For information about our underwriting and rates, see https://www.mgic.com/underwriting.

Safe Harbor Statement

Forward Looking Statements and Risk Factors:

Our actual results could be affected by the risk factors below. These risk factors should be reviewed in connection with this press release and our periodic reports to the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"). These risk factors may also cause actual results to differ materially from the results contemplated by forward looking statements that we may make. Forward looking statements consist of statements which relate to matters other than historical fact, including matters that inherently refer to future events. Among others, statements that include words such as "believe," "anticipate," "will" or "expect," or words of similar import, are forward looking statements. These risk factors, including the discussion of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, speak only as of the date of this press release and are subject to change without notice as the Company cannot predict all risks relating to this evolving set of events. We are not undertaking any obligation to update any forward looking statements or other statements we may make even though these statements may be affected by events or circumstances occurring after the forward looking statements or other statements were made. No investor should rely on the fact that such statements are current at any time other than the time at which this press release was delivered for dissemination to the public.

While we communicate with security analysts from time to time, it is against our policy to disclose to them any material non-public information or other confidential information. Accordingly, investors should not assume that we agree with any statement or report issued by any analyst irrespective of the content of the statement or report, and such reports are not our responsibility.

Use of Non-GAAP financial measures

We believe that use of the Non-GAAP measures of adjusted pre-tax operating income (loss), adjusted net operating income (loss) and adjusted net operating income (loss) per diluted share facilitate the evaluation of the company's core financial performance thereby providing relevant information to investors. These measures are not recognized in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (GAAP) and should not be viewed as alternatives to GAAP measures of performance.

Adjusted pre-tax operating income (loss) is defined as GAAP income (loss) before tax, excluding the effects of net realized investment gains (losses), gain and losses on debt extinguishment, net impairment losses recognized in earnings and infrequent or unusual non-operating items where applicable.

Adjusted net operating income (loss) is defined as GAAP net income (loss) excluding the after-tax effects of net realized investment gains (losses), gain and losses on debt extinguishment, net impairment losses recognized in earnings, and infrequent or unusual non-operating items where applicable. The amounts of adjustments to components of pre-tax operating income (loss) are tax effected using a federal statutory tax rate of 21%.

Adjusted net operating income (loss) per diluted share is calculated in a manner consistent with the accounting standard regarding earnings per share by dividing (i) adjusted net operating income (loss) after making adjustments for interest expense on convertible debt, whenever the impact is dilutive, by (ii) diluted weighted average common shares outstanding, which reflects share dilution from unvested restricted stock units and from convertible debt when dilutive under the "if-converted" method.

Although adjusted pre-tax operating income (loss) and adjusted net operating income (loss) exclude certain items that have occurred in the past and are expected to occur in the future, the excluded items represent items that are: (1) not viewed as part of the operating performance of our primary activities; or (2) impacted by both discretionary and other economic or regulatory factors and are not necessarily indicative of operating trends, or both. These adjustments, along with the reasons for their treatment, are described below. Trends in the profitability of our fundamental operating activities can be more clearly identified without the fluctuations of these adjustments. Other companies may calculate these measures differently. Therefore, their measures may not be comparable to those used by us.

(1)

Net realized investment gains (losses). The recognition of net realized investment gains or losses can vary significantly across periods as the timing of individual securities sales is highly discretionary and is influenced by such factors as market opportunities, our tax and capital profile, and overall market cycles.

(2)

Gains and losses on debt extinguishment. Gains and losses on debt extinguishment result from discretionary activities that are undertaken to enhance our capital position, improve our debt profile, and/or reduce potential dilution from our outstanding convertible debt.

(3)

Net impairment losses recognized in earnings. The recognition of net impairment losses on investments can vary significantly in both size and timing, depending on market credit cycles, individual issuer performance, and general economic conditions.

(4)

Infrequent or unusual non-operating items.  Items that are non-recurring in nature and are not part of our primary operating activities.

 

MGIC INVESTMENT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS (UNAUDITED)












Three Months Ended

June 30,


Six Months Ended June 30,

(In thousands, except per share data)


2021


2020


2021


2020










Net premiums written


$

241,737



$

221,385



$

483,236



$

467,392


Revenues









Net premiums earned


$

251,539



$

243,562



$

506,584



$

504,463


Net investment income


41,129



39,679



79,022



81,026


Net realized investment gains


2,173



6,701



4,388



8,592


Other revenue


3,011



4,026



5,815



6,780


Total revenues


297,852



293,968



595,809



600,861


Losses and expenses









Losses incurred, net


29,164



217,374



68,800



278,330


Underwriting and other expenses, net


56,823



47,182



107,542



91,954


Interest expense


17,997



12,929



35,982



25,855


Total losses and expenses


103,984



277,485



212,324



396,139


Income before tax


193,868



16,483



383,485



204,722


Provision for income taxes


40,817



2,436



80,413



40,870


Net income


$

153,051



$

14,047



$

303,072



$

163,852


Net income per diluted share


$

0.44



$

0.04



$

0.87



$

0.48


 

MGIC INVESTMENT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

EARNINGS PER SHARE (UNAUDITED)












Three Months Ended June 30,


Six Months Ended June 30,

(In thousands, except per share data)


2021


2020


2021


2020

Net income


$

153,051



$

14,047



$

303,072



$

163,852


Interest expense, net of tax:









9% Convertible Junior Subordinated Debentures due 2063


3,712





7,423



9,132


Diluted net income available to common shareholders


$

156,763



$

14,047



$

310,495



$

172,984











Weighted average shares - basic


339,326



338,593



339,116



341,323


Effect of dilutive securities:









Unvested restricted stock units


1,425



1,068



1,560



1,551


9% Convertible Junior Subordinated Debentures due 2063


15,785





15,785



19,129


Weighted average shares - diluted


356,536



339,661



356,461



362,003


Net income per diluted share


$

0.44



$

0.04



$

0.87



$

0.48


 

NON-GAAP RECONCILIATIONS


Reconciliation of Income before tax / Net income to Adjusted pre-tax operating income / Adjusted net operating income



Three Months Ended June 30,



2021


2020

(In thousands, except per share amounts)


Pre-tax


Tax Effect


Net

(after-tax)


Pre-tax


Tax Effect


Net

(after-tax)

Income before tax / Net income


$

193,868



$

40,817



$

153,051



$

16,483



$

2,436



$

14,047


Adjustments:













Net realized investment gains


(1,927)



(405)



(1,522)



(5,274)



(1,107)



(4,167)


Adjusted pre-tax operating income / Adjusted
net operating income


$

191,941



$

40,412



$

151,529



$

11,209



$

1,329



$

9,880















Reconciliation of Net income per diluted share to Adjusted net operating income per diluted share

Weighted average shares - diluted






356,536







339,661


Net income per diluted share






$

0.44







$

0.04


Net realized investment gains












(0.01)


Adjusted net operating income per diluted
share






$

0.44







$

0.03
















Reconciliation of Income before tax / Net income to Adjusted pre-tax operating income / Adjusted net operating income



Six Months Ended June 30,



2021


2020

(In thousands, except per share amounts)


Pre-tax


Tax Effect


Net

(after-tax)


Pre-tax


Tax Effect


Net

(after-tax)

Income before tax / Net income


$

383,485



$

80,413



$

303,072



$

204,722



$

40,870



$

163,852


Adjustments:













Net realized investment gains


(4,549)



(955)



(3,594)



(8,149)



(1,711)



(6,438)


Adjusted pre-tax operating income / Adjusted
net operating income


$

378,936



$

79,458



$

299,478



$

196,573



$

39,159



$

157,414















Reconciliation of Net income per diluted share to Adjusted net operating income per diluted share

Weighted average shares - diluted






356,461







362,003















Net income per diluted share






$

0.87







$

0.48


Net realized investment gains






(0.01)







(0.02)


Adjusted net operating income per diluted
share






$

0.86







$

0.46


 

MGIC INVESTMENT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (UNAUDITED)










June 30,


December 31,


June 30,

(In thousands, except per share data)


2021


2020


2020

ASSETS







Investments (1)


$

6,982,962



$

6,682,911



$

5,883,315


Cash and cash equivalents


178,635



287,953



366,715


Restricted cash and cash equivalents


12,318



8,727



4,678


Reinsurance recoverable on loss reserves (2)


111,153



95,042



63,444


Home office and equipment, net


45,477



47,144



47,738


Deferred insurance policy acquisition costs


22,630



21,561



20,645


Other assets


222,552



211,188



188,053


Total assets


$

7,575,727



$

7,354,526



$

6,574,588









LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY







Liabilities:







Loss reserves (2)


$

936,236



$

880,537



$

797,396


Unearned premiums


263,751



287,099



343,229


Federal home loan bank advance


155,000



155,000



155,000


Senior notes


880,443



879,379



421,443


Convertible junior debentures


208,814



208,814



256,872


Other liabilities


216,776



244,711



217,293


Total liabilities


2,661,020



2,655,540



2,191,233


Shareholders' equity


4,914,707



4,698,986



4,383,355


Total liabilities and shareholders' equity


$

7,575,727



$

7,354,526



$

6,574,588


Book value per share (3)


$

14.48



$

13.88



$

12.95









(1) Investments include net unrealized gains on securities


$

282,846



$

345,124



$

265,194


(2) Loss reserves, net of reinsurance recoverable on loss reserves


$

825,083



$

785,495



$

733,952


(3) Shares outstanding


339,316



338,573



338,567


 

MGIC INVESTMENT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION - NEW INSURANCE WRITTEN
















2021


2020


Year-to-date


Q2


Q1


Q4


Q3


Q2


2021


2020

New primary insurance written (NIW) (billions)

$

33.6



$

30.8



$

33.2



$

32.8



$

28.2



$

64.4



$

46.1
















Monthly (including split premium plans) and annual premium plans

31.4



27.9



31.3



30.6



24.9



59.3



40.1


Single premium plans

2.2



2.9



1.9



2.2



3.3



5.1



6.0
















Product mix as a % of primary NIW














FICO < 680

5

%


4

%


4

%


4

%


4

%


5

%


3

%

>95% LTVs

12

%


8

%


9

%


9

%


9

%


10

%


9

%

>45% DTI

13

%


12

%


11

%


11

%


11

%


13

%


12

%

Singles

7

%


9

%


6

%


7

%


12

%


8

%


13

%

Refinances

21

%


40

%


34

%


31

%


43

%


30

%


40

%















New primary risk written (billions)

$

8.5



$

7.2



$

7.9



$

7.9



$

6.6



$

15.7



$

11.0


 

MGIC INVESTMENT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION - INSURANCE IN FORCE and RISK IN FORCE












2021


2020


Q2


Q1


Q4


Q3


Q2

Primary Insurance In Force (IIF) (billions)

$

262.0



$

251.7



$

246.6



$

238.9



$

230.5


Total # of loans

1,151,692



1,130,362



1,126,079



1,111,910



1,092,437


Flow # of loans

1,118,713



1,096,132



1,090,877



1,075,794



1,055,486












Premium Yield










Inforce portfolio yield (1)

42.6



43.9



45.0



46.3



48.1


Premium refunds

(0.2)



(0.8)



(0.3)



(0.6)



(0.3)


Accelerated earnings on single premium

3.1



4.4



5.3



5.5



5.9


Total direct premium yield

45.5



47.5



50.0



51.2



53.7


Ceded premiums earned, net of profit
commission and
assumed premiums (2)

(6.4)



(6.6)



(6.9)



(7.6)



(11.0)


Net premium yield

39.1



40.9



43.1



43.6



42.7












Average Loan Size of IIF (thousands)

$

227.5



$

222.7



$

219.0



$

214.9



$

211.0


Flow only

$

230.1



$

225.2



$

221.5



$

217.3



$

213.4












Annual Persistency

57.1

%


56.2

%


60.5

%


64.5

%


68.2

%











Primary Risk In Force (RIF) (billions)

$

65.3



$

62.6



$

61.8



$

60.4



$

58.7


By FICO (%) (3)










FICO 760 & >

41

%


41

%


40

%


40

%


39

%

FICO 740-759

17

%


17

%


17

%


17

%


17

%

FICO 720-739

14

%


14

%


14

%


14

%


14

%

FICO 700-719

11

%


11

%


11

%


11

%


11

%

FICO 680-699

8

%


8

%


8

%


8

%


8

%

FICO 660-679

4

%


4

%


4

%


4

%


4

%

FICO 640-659

2

%


2

%


3

%


3

%


3

%

FICO 639 & <

3

%


3

%


3

%


3

%


4

%











Average Coverage Ratio (RIF/IIF)

24.9

%


24.9

%


25.1

%


25.3

%


25.5

%











Direct Pool RIF (millions)










With aggregate loss limits

$

208



$

209



$

210



$

211



$

212


Without aggregate loss limits

$

114



$

122



$

130



$

139



$

148




(1)

Total direct premiums earned, excluding accelerated premiums from premium refunds and single premium policy cancellations divided by average primary insurance in force.

(2)

Ceded premiums earned, net of profit commissions and assumed premiums. Assumed premiums include our participation in GSE Credit Risk Transfer programs, of which the impact on the net premium yield was 0.4 bps in the second quarter of 2021 and 0.5 bps in  2020.

(3)

The FICO credit score at the time of origination for a loan with multiple borrowers is the lowest of the borrowers' "decision FICO scores."  A borrower's "decision FICO score" is determined as follows: if there are three FICO scores available, the middle FICO score is used; if two FICO scores are available, the lower of the two is used; if only one FICO score is available, it is used.

 

MGIC INVESTMENT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION - DELINQUENCY STATISTICS













2021


2020


Q2


Q1


Q4


Q3


Q2


Primary IIF - Delinquent Roll Forward - # of Loans











Beginning Delinquent Inventory

52,775



57,710



64,418



69,326



27,384



New Notices

9,036



13,011



15,193



20,924



57,584



Cures

(18,460)



(17,628)



(21,584)



(25,446)



(14,964)



Paid claims

(346)



(312)



(312)



(375)



(661)



Rescissions and denials

(6)



(6)



(5)



(11)



(17)



Ending Delinquent Inventory (1)

42,999



52,775



57,710



64,418



69,326














Primary IIF Delinquency Rate

3.71

%


4.65

%


5.11

%


5.79

%


6.35

%


Primary claim received inventory included in
ending delinquent inventory

159



151



159



172



247














Primary IIF - # of Delinquent Loans - Flow only

38,715



47,880



52,459



58,933



63,135



Primary IIF Delinquency Rate - Flow only

3.44

%


4.35

%


4.80

%


5.48

%


5.98

%













Composition of Cures











Reported delinquent and cured intraquarter

2,334



3,452



3,304



4,405



6,751



Number of payments delinquent prior to cure











3 payments or less

5,378



5,547



6,425



13,954



5,905



4-11 payments

7,075



8,166



11,471



6,683



1,961



12 payments or more

3,673



463



384



404



347



Total Cures in Quarter

18,460



17,628



21,584



25,446



14,964














Composition of Paids











Number of payments delinquent at time of
claim payment











3 payments or less





3



1



3



4-11 payments

14



25



28



49



58



12 payments or more

332



287



281



325



600



Total Paids in Quarter

346



312



312



375



661














Aging of Primary Delinquent Inventory











Consecutive months delinquent











      3 months or less

6,513


15

%

9,194


17

%

11,542


20

%

15,879


25

%

50,646


73

%

      4-11 months

12,840


30

%

29,832


57

%

34,620


60

%

37,702


58

%

8,370


12

%

      12 months or more

23,646


55

%

13,749


26

%

11,548


20

%

10,837


17

%

10,310


15

%












Number of payments delinquent











      3 payments or less

8,619


20

%

11,440


22

%

14,183


25

%

18,541


29

%

51,877


75

%

      4-11 payments

14,894


35

%

25,016


47

%

35,977


62

%

38,999


60

%

11,026


16

%

      12 payments or more

19,486


45

%

16,319


31

%

7,550


13

%

6,878


11

%

6,423


9

%



(1)

As of June 30, 2021 55% of our delinquency inventory were reported to us as subject to forbearance plan, down from a high of 67% at June 30, 2020. We believe substantially all represent forbearances related to COVID-19.

 

MGIC INVESTMENT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES





ADDITIONAL INFORMATION - RESERVES and CLAIMS PAID




















2021


2020


Year-to-date


Q2


Q1


Q4


Q3


Q2


2021


2020

Reserves (millions)














Primary Direct Loss Reserves

$

928



$

905



$

871



$

831



$

787






Pool Direct loss reserves

7



7



8



8



10






Other Gross Reserves

1



1



2



1








Total Gross Loss Reserves

$

936



$

913



$

881



$

840



$

797




















Primary Average Direct Reserve
Per Delinquency

$

21,147



$

17,147



$

15,100



$

12,907



$

11,357




















Net Paid Claims (millions) (1)

$

14



$

15



$

18



$

18



$

32



$

29



$

78


Total primary (excluding
settlements)

11



12



12



15



29



23



71


Pool





1









1


Reinsurance



(1)



(1)





(2)



(1)



(3)


Other

3



4



6



3



5



7



9
















Primary Average Claim Payment
(thousands)

$

34.1



$

36.7



$

40.4



$

40.6



$

42.9



$

35.3



$

45.4


Flow only

$

34.8



$

32.3



$

31.2



$

37.2



$

36.7



$

33.7



$

39.4


















(1)

 Net paid claims, as presented, does not include amounts received in conjunction with terminations or commutations of reinsurance agreements.

 

MGIC INVESTMENT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES





ADDITIONAL INFORMATION - REINSURANCE




















2021


2020


Year-to-date


Q2


Q1


Q4


Q3


Q2


2021


2020

Quota Share Reinsurance














% NIW subject to reinsurance

81.6

%


73.7

%


74.9

%


76.0

%


73.5

%


77.8

%


72.9

%

Ceded premiums written and earned (millions)

$

34.0



$

33.4



$

36.2



$

43.5



$

61.4



$

67.4



$

88.2


Ceded losses incurred (millions)

$

8.9



$

8.4



$

12.5



$

20.7



$

39.0



$

17.3



$

44.8


Ceding commissions (millions) (included in
underwriting and other expenses)

$

12.9



$

13.1



$

12.6



$

12.1



$

12.0



$

26.0



$

23.4


Profit commission (millions) (included in
ceded premiums)

$

31.0



$

31.9



$

26.6



$

17.1



$

(1.2)



$

62.9



$

28.8
















Excess-of-Loss Reinsurance














Ceded premiums earned (millions)

$

10.0



$

10.3



$

8.0



$

3.7



$

4.4



$

20.3



$

9.1


Ceded losses incurred (millions)

$



$



$



$



$



$



$


 

MGIC INVESTMENT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: BULK STATISTICS AND MI RATIOS
















2021


2020


Year-to-date


Q2


Q1


Q4


Q3


Q2


2021


2020

Bulk Primary Insurance Statistics














Insurance in force (billions)

$4.6


$4.8


$5.0


$5.1


$5.3





Risk in force (billions)

$1.3


$1.4


$1.4


$1.4


$1.5





Average loan size (thousands)

$140.4


$141.0


$141.5


$142.4


$142.9





Number of delinquent loans

4,284


4,895


5,251


5,485


6,191





Delinquency rate

12.99%


14.30%


14.92%


15.19%


16.75%





Primary paid claims (excluding settlements)
(millions)

$1


$4


$5


$4


$9


$5


$23

Average claim payment (thousands)

$29.8


$50.5


$79.0


$53.6


$66.0


$42.0


$66.3















Mortgage Guaranty Insurance Corporation - Risk to
Capital

8.9:1

(1)

8.8:1


9.2:1


9.4:1


9.6:1





Combined Insurance Companies - Risk to Capital

8.9:1

(1)

8.8:1


9.1:1


9.4:1


9.5:1



















GAAP loss ratio (insurance operations only)

11.6%


15.5%


17.5%


15.9%


89.2%


13.6%


55.2%

GAAP underwriting expense ratio (insurance
operations only)

22.3%


19.8%


19.4%


20.2%


20.1%


21.1%


18.6%















(1)     Preliminary

 

Risk Factors

As used below, "we," "our" and "us" refer to MGIC Investment Corporation's consolidated operations or to MGIC Investment Corporation, as the context requires; and "MGIC" refers to Mortgage Guaranty Insurance Corporation.

Risk Factors Relating to the COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic may continue to materially impact our financial results and may also materially impact our business, liquidity and financial condition.

The COVID-19 pandemic had a material impact on our 2020 financial results. While uncertain, the future impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Company's business, financial results, liquidity and/or financial condition may also be material. The magnitude of the impact will be influenced by various factors, including the length and severity of the pandemic in the United States, efforts to reduce the transmission of COVID-19, the level of unemployment, and the impact of government initiatives and actions taken by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (the "GSEs") (including mortgage forbearance and modification programs) to mitigate the economic harm caused by COVID-19.

The COVID-19 pandemic may continue to impact our business in various ways, including the following, each of which is described in more detail in the remainder of these risk factors:

  • Our incurred losses will increase if the number of insured mortgages in our delinquency inventory increases. We establish reserves for insurance losses when delinquency notices are received on loans that are two or more payments past due and for loans we estimate are delinquent prior to the close of the accounting period but for which delinquency notices have not yet been reported to us (this is often referred to as "IBNR"). In addition, our current estimates of the number of delinquencies for which we will receive claims, and the amount, or severity, of each claim, may increase.
  • We may be required to maintain more capital under the private mortgage insurer eligibility requirements ("PMIERs") of the GSEs, which generally require more capital to be held for delinquent loans than for performing loans and require more capital to be held as the number of payments missed on delinquent loans increases.
  • If the number of delinquencies increases, the number of claims we must pay over time will generally increase.
  • Our access to the reinsurance and capital markets may be limited and the terms under which we are able to access such markets may be less attractive than the terms of our previous transactions.

Risk Factors Relating to the Mortgage Insurance Industry and its Regulation

Downturns in the domestic economy or declines in home prices may result in more homeowners defaulting and our losses increasing, with a corresponding decrease in our returns.

Losses result from events that reduce a borrower's ability or willingness to make mortgage payments, such as unemployment, health issues, family status, and whether the home of a borrower who defaults on a mortgage can be sold for an amount that will cover unpaid principal and interest and the expenses of the sale. A deterioration in economic conditions, including an increase in unemployment, generally increases the likelihood that borrowers will not have sufficient income to pay their mortgages and can also adversely affect home prices, which in turn can influence the willingness of borrowers with sufficient resources to make mortgage payments when the mortgage balance exceeds the value of the home. The seasonally-adjusted Purchase-Only U.S. Home Price Index of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (the "FHFA"), which is based on single-family properties whose mortgages have been purchased or securitized by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac, indicates that home prices increased by 7.7% in the first five months of 2021, after increasing by 11.5%, 5.4%, 5.7% and 6.3% in 2020, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The price-to-income ratio in some markets exceeds its historical average, in part as a result of recent home price appreciation outpacing increases in income. Home prices may decline even absent a deterioration in economic conditions due to declines in demand for homes, which in turn may result from changes in buyers' perceptions of the potential for future appreciation, restrictions on and the cost of mortgage credit due to more stringent underwriting standards, higher interest rates, changes to the tax deductibility of mortgage interest, decreases in the rate of household formations, or other factors.

The unemployment rate rose from 3.5% as of December 31, 2019, to 14.7% as of April 30, 2020. It was 5.9% as of June 30, 2021. High levels of unemployment may result in an increasing number of loans in our delinquency inventory and an increasing number of insurance claims; however, the increases are difficult to predict given the uncertainty in the current market environment, including uncertainty about the length and severity of the COVID-19 pandemic; efforts to reduce the transmission of COVID-19; effects of forbearance programs enacted by the GSEs, various states and municipalities; and effects of past and future government stimulus programs.

Forbearance for federally-insured mortgages (including those delivered to or purchased by the GSEs) allows for mortgage payments to be suspended for up to 18 months: an initial forbearance period of up to six months; if requested by the borrower following contact by the servicer, an extension of up to six months; and, for loans in a COVID-19 forbearance plan as of February 28, 2021, an additional extension of up to six months, subject to certain limits. The servicer of the loan must begin attempts to contact the borrower no later than 30 days prior to the expiration of any forbearance plan term and must continue outreach attempts until appropriate contact is made or the forbearance plan term has expired. In certain circumstances, the servicer will be unable to contact the borrower and the forbearance plan will expire after the first 180-day plan. A delinquent loan for which the borrower was unable to be contacted and that is not in a forbearance plan may be more likely to result in a claim than a delinquent loan in a forbearance plan.

Historically, forbearance plans have reduced the incidence of our losses on affected loans. However, given the uncertainty surrounding the long-term economic impact of COVID-19, it is difficult to predict the ultimate effect of COVID-19 related forbearances on our loss incidence. At June 30, 2021, 23,849 of the loans in our delinquency inventory were reported to us as in forbearance. Of the 46,684 loans in our delinquency inventory as of June 30, 2020 that were reported to us as in forbearance, 70.2% are no longer in the default inventory as of June 30, 2021; 22.5% are still in the delinquency inventory and reported to us as in forbearance; and 7.4% are still in the delinquency inventory but no longer reported to us as in forbearance. As of June 30, 2021, 55% of the loans in forbearance have reached the twelve-month anniversary of their forbearance plans, 16% have reached the nine-month anniversary of their forbearance plans, and 11% have reached the six-month anniversary of their forbearance plans.  Whether a loan delinquency will cure, including through modification, when forbearance ends will depend on the economic circumstances of the borrower at that time. The severity of losses associated with delinquencies that do not cure will depend on economic conditions at that time, including home prices.

Foreclosures on mortgages purchased or securitized by the GSEs have been suspended through July 31, 2021. Under a CFPB rule that is generally effective from August 31, 2021 through December 31, 2021 (from July 31, 2021 for servicers of GSE mortgages), with limited exceptions, servicers must ensure that at least one temporary procedural safeguard has been met before referring 120-day delinquent loans for foreclosure.

We may not continue to meet the GSEs' private mortgage insurer eligibility requirements and our returns may decrease if we are required to maintain more capital in order to maintain our eligibility.

We must comply with a GSE's PMIERs to be eligible to insure loans delivered to or purchased by that GSE. The PMIERs include financial requirements, as well as business, quality control and certain transaction approval requirements. The financial requirements of the PMIERs require a mortgage insurer's "Available Assets" (generally only the most liquid assets of an insurer) to equal or exceed its "Minimum Required Assets" (which are generally based on an insurer's book of risk in force and calculated from tables of factors with several risk dimensions, reduced for credit given for risk ceded under reinsurance agreements).

Based on our interpretation of the PMIERs, as of June 30, 2021, MGIC's Available Assets totaled $5.7 billion, or $2.3 billion in excess of its Minimum Required Assets. MGIC is in compliance with the PMIERs and eligible to insure loans purchased by the GSEs. Our "Minimum Required Assets" reflect a credit for risk ceded under our reinsurance transactions, which are discussed in our risk factor titled "The mix of business we write affects our Minimum Required Assets under the PMIERs, our premium yields and the likelihood of losses occurring." The calculated credit for excess of loss reinsurance transactions under PMIERs is generally based on the PMIERs requirement of the covered loans and the attachment and detachment points of the coverage, all of which fluctuate over time. PMIERs credit is generally not given for the reinsured risk above the PMIERs requirement. The GSEs have discretion to further limit reinsurance credit under the PMIERs. The total credit for risk ceded under our reinsurance transactions is subject to a modest reduction and is subject to periodic review by the GSEs. There is a risk we will not receive our current level of credit in future periods for ceded risk. In addition, we may not receive the same level of credit under future reinsurance transactions that we receive under existing transactions. If MGIC is not allowed certain levels of credit under the PMIERs, under certain circumstances, MGIC may terminate the reinsurance transactions without penalty.

The PMIERs generally require us to hold significantly more Minimum Required Assets for delinquent loans than for performing loans and the Minimum Required Assets required to be held increases as the number of payments missed on a delinquent loan increases. For delinquent loans whose initial missed payment occurred on or after March 1, 2020 and prior to April 1, 2021 (the "COVID-19 Crisis Period"), the Minimum Required Assets are generally reduced by 70% for at least three months. The 70% reduction will continue, or be newly applied, for delinquent loans that are subject to a forbearance plan that is granted in response to a financial hardship related to COVID-19, the terms of which are materially consistent with terms of forbearance plans offered by Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae. Loans considered to be subject to a forbearance plan include those that are in a repayment plan or loan modification trial period following the forbearance plan. As noted above, if a servicer of a loan is unable to contact the borrower prior to the expiration of the first 180-day forbearance plan term, or if the forbearance plan reaches its twelve-month anniversary and is not further extended, the forbearance plan generally will expire. In such case, the 70% reduction in Minimum Required Assets for that loan will no longer be applicable, our Minimum Required Assets will increase and our excess of Available Assets over Minimum Required Assets will decrease. As of June 30, 2021, application of the 70% reduction decreased our Minimum Required Assets from approximately $3.9 billion to approximately $3.4 billion. We do not expect our Minimum Required Assets for the loans in forbearance to increase by the full amount of the reduction upon expiration of the forbearance plans because we expect some loans whose forbearance plans expire to have their delinquencies cured through modification or otherwise.

Despite reducing the Minimum Required Assets for certain delinquent loans by 70%, an increasing number of loan delinquencies caused by the COVID-19 pandemic may cause our Minimum Required Assets to exceed our Available Assets. As of June 30, 2021, there were 42,999 loans in our delinquency inventory, of which 55% were reported to us as being subject to a forbearance plan. We believe substantially all of the reported forbearance plans are COVID-19-related. We are unable to predict the ultimate number of loans that will become delinquent as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

If our Available Assets fall below our Minimum Required Assets, we would not be in compliance with the PMIERs. The PMIERs provide a list of remediation actions for a mortgage insurer's non-compliance, with additional actions possible in the GSEs' discretion. At the extreme, the GSEs may suspend or terminate our eligibility to insure loans purchased by them. Such suspension or termination would significantly reduce the volume of our new insurance written ("NIW"); the substantial majority of which is for loans delivered to or purchased by the GSEs. In addition to the increase in Minimum Required Assets associated with delinquent loans, factors that may negatively impact MGIC's ability to continue to comply with the financial requirements of the PMIERs include the following:

  • The GSEs may make the PMIERs more onerous in the future. The PMIERs provide that the factors that determine Minimum Required Assets will be updated periodically, or as needed if there is a significant change in macroeconomic conditions or loan performance. We do not anticipate that the regular periodic updates will occur more frequently than once every two years. The PMIERs state that the GSEs will provide notice 180 days prior to the effective date of updates to the factors; however, the GSEs may amend the PMIERs at any time, including by imposing restrictions specific to our company.
  • There may be future implications for PMIERs as a result of changes to the regulatory capital requirements for the GSEs. In November 2020, the FHFA adopted a rule containing a risk-based capital framework for the GSEs that will increase their capital requirements, including through a decrease in credit received for credit risk transfer "CRT" transactions, effective on the later of (i) the date of termination of the FHFA's conservatorship of the applicable GSE; (ii) sixty days after publication of the adopted rule in the Federal Register; or (iii) any later compliance date provided in a consent order or other transition order applicable to a GSE. The increase in capital requirements may ultimately result in an increase in the Minimum Required Assets required to be held by mortgage insurers, including through a decrease in credit received for mortgage insurers' reinsurance transactions.
  • Our future operating results may be negatively impacted by the matters discussed in the rest of these risk factors. Such matters could decrease our revenues, increase our losses or require the use of assets, thereby creating a shortfall in Available Assets.

Should capital be needed by MGIC in the future, capital contributions from our holding company may not be available due to competing demands on holding company resources, including for repayment of debt.

Because we establish loss reserves only upon a loan delinquency rather than based on estimates of our ultimate losses on risk in force, losses may have a disproportionate adverse effect on our earnings in certain periods.

In accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, we establish case reserves for insurance losses and loss adjustment expenses only when delinquency notices are received for insured loans that are two or more payments past due and for loans we estimate are delinquent but for which delinquency notices have not yet been received (this is often referred to as "IBNR"). Losses that may occur from loans that are not delinquent are not reflected in our financial statements, except in the case where a premium deficiency exists. A premium deficiency would be recorded if the present value of expected future losses and expenses exceeds the present value of expected future premiums and already established loss reserves on the applicable loans. As a result, future losses on loans that are not currently delinquent may have a material impact on future results as such losses emerge. As of June 30, 2021, we had established case reserves and reported losses incurred for 42,999 loans in our delinquency inventory and our IBNR reserve totaled $28 million. Though not reflected in our June 30, 2021 financial results, as of July 31, 2021, our delinquency inventory had decreased to 41,411 loans. The number of loans in our delinquency inventory may increase from that level as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, including as a result of high unemployment associated with initiatives intended to reduce the transmission of COVID-19. As a result, our losses incurred may increase in future periods. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the number of delinquencies and our losses incurred will be influenced by various factors, including those discussed in our risk factor titled "The COVID-19 pandemic may continue to materially impact our financial results and may also materially impact our business, liquidity and financial condition."

Because loss reserve estimates are subject to uncertainties, paid claims may be substantially different than our loss reserves.

When we establish case reserves, we estimate our ultimate loss on delinquent loans by estimating the number of such loans that will result in a claim payment (the "claim rate"), and further estimating the amount of the claim payment (the "claim severity"). Our estimates incorporate anticipated cures, loss mitigation activity, rescissions and curtailments. The establishment of loss reserves is subject to inherent uncertainty and requires judgment by management. Our actual claim payments may be substantially different than our loss reserve estimates. Our estimates could be affected by several factors, including a change in regional or national economic conditions, the impact of past and future government initiatives and actions taken by the GSEs to mitigate the economic harm caused by the COVID-19 pandemic (including foreclosure moratoriums and mortgage forbearance and modification programs) and efforts to reduce the transmission of COVID-19, and a change in the length of time loans are delinquent before claims are received.  All else being equal, the longer a loan is delinquent before a claim is received, the greater the severity. In light of the uncertainty caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, including the impact of foreclosure moratoriums and forbearance programs, the average time it takes to receive a claim may increase. The change in economic conditions may include changes in unemployment, including prolonged unemployment as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, which may affect the ability of borrowers to make mortgage payments, and changes in home prices, which may affect the willingness of borrowers to make mortgage payments when the value of the home is below the mortgage balance. The economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic may be disproportionately concentrated in certain geographic regions. Information about the geographic dispersion of our insurance in force can be found in our Annual Reports on Form 10-K and our Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. Changes to our claim rate and claim severity estimates could have a material impact on our future results, even in a stable economic environment. Losses incurred generally have followed a seasonal trend in which the second half of the year has weaker credit performance than the first half, with higher new default notice activity and a lower cure rate; however, the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic affected this pattern in 2020 when new delinquency notice activity was higher in the second quarter of the year.

The amount of insurance we write could be adversely affected if lenders and investors select alternatives to private mortgage insurance.

Alternatives to private mortgage insurance include:

  • investors using risk mitigation and credit risk transfer techniques other than private mortgage insurance,
  • lenders and other investors holding mortgages in portfolio and self-insuring,
  • lenders using Federal Housing Administration ("FHA"), U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs ("VA") and other government mortgage insurance programs, and
  • lenders originating mortgages using piggyback structures to avoid private mortgage insurance, such as a first mortgage with an 80% loan-to-value ("LTV") ratio and a second mortgage with a 10%, 15% or 20% LTV ratio rather than a first mortgage with a 90%, 95% or 100% LTV ratio that has private mortgage insurance.

The GSEs' charters generally require credit enhancement for a low down payment mortgage loan (a loan in an amount that exceeds 80% of a home's value) in order for such loan to be eligible for purchase by the GSEs. Private mortgage insurance generally has been purchased by lenders in primary mortgage market transactions to satisfy this credit enhancement requirement. In 2018, the GSEs initiated secondary mortgage market programs with loan level mortgage default coverage provided by various (re)insurers that are not mortgage insurers governed by PMIERs, and that are not selected by the lenders. These programs, which currently account for a small percentage of the low down payment market, compete with traditional private mortgage insurance and, due to differences in policy terms, they may offer premium rates that are below prevalent single premium lender-paid mortgage insurance ("LPMI") rates. We participate in these programs from time to time. See our risk factor titled "Changes in the business practices of the GSEs, federal legislation that changes their charters or a restructuring of the GSEs could reduce our revenues or increase our losses" for a discussion of various business practices of the GSEs that may be changed, including through expansion or modification of these programs.

The GSEs (and other investors) have also used other forms of credit enhancement that did not involve traditional private mortgage insurance, such as engaging in credit-linked note transactions executed in the capital markets, or using other forms of debt issuances or securitizations that transfer credit risk directly to other investors, including competitors and an affiliate of MGIC; using other risk mitigation techniques in conjunction with reduced levels of private mortgage insurance coverage; or accepting credit risk without credit enhancement.

The FHA's share of the low down payment residential mortgages that were subject to FHA, VA, USDA or primary private mortgage insurance was 23.2% in the first quarter of 2021, 23.4% in 2020 and 28.2% in 2019. Beginning in 2012, the FHA's share has been as low as 23.2% (in the first quarter of 2021) and as high as 42.1% (in 2012). Factors that influence the FHA's market share include relative rates and fees, underwriting guidelines and loan limits of the FHA, VA, private mortgage insurers and the GSEs; lenders' perceptions of legal risks under FHA versus GSE programs; flexibility for the FHA to establish new products as a result of federal legislation and programs; returns expected to be obtained by lenders for Ginnie Mae securitization of FHA-insured loans compared to those obtained from selling loans to the GSEs for securitization; and differences in policy terms, such as the ability of a borrower to cancel insurance coverage under certain circumstances. The current Presidential Administration appears more likely than the last Administration to reduce the FHA's mortgage insurance premium rates. Such a rate reduction would negatively impact our NIW; however, given the many factors that influence the FHA's market share, it is difficult to predict the impact. In addition, we cannot predict how the factors that affect the FHA's share of new insurance written will change in the future.

The VA's share of the low down payment residential mortgages that were subject to FHA, VA, USDA or primary private mortgage insurance was 34.8% in the first quarter of 2021, 30.9% in 2020 and 25.2% in 2019. Beginning in 2012, the VA's share has been as low as 22.8% (in 2013) and as high as 34.8% (in the first quarter of 2021). We believe that the VA's market share has generally been elevated in recent years because of an increase in the number of borrowers that are eligible for the VA's program, which offers 100% LTV ratio loans and charges a one-time funding fee that can be included in the loan amount, and because eligible borrowers have opted to use the VA program when refinancing their mortgages.

Changes in the business practices of the GSEs, federal legislation that changes their charters or a restructuring of the GSEs could reduce our revenues or increase our losses.

The substantial majority of our NIW is for loans purchased by the GSEs; therefore, the business practices of the GSEs greatly impact our business and they include:

  • The GSEs' PMIERs, the financial requirements of which are discussed in our risk factor titled "We may not continue to meet the GSEs' private mortgage insurer eligibility requirements and our returns may decrease if we are required to maintain more capital in order to maintain our eligibility."
  • The capital and collateral requirements for participants in the GSEs' alternative forms of credit enhancement discussed in our risk factor titled "The amount of insurance we write could be adversely affected if lenders and investors select alternatives to private mortgage insurance."
  • The level of private mortgage insurance coverage, subject to the limitations of the GSEs' charters, when private mortgage insurance is used as the required credit enhancement on low down payment mortgages (the GSEs generally require a level of mortgage insurance coverage that is higher than the level of coverage required by their charters; any change in the required level of coverage will impact our new risk written).
  • The amount of loan level price adjustments and guaranty fees (which result in higher costs to borrowers) that the GSEs assess on loans that require private mortgage insurance. The recently adopted GSE capital framework may lead the GSEs to increase their guaranty fees.
  • Whether the GSEs select or influence the mortgage lender's selection of the mortgage insurer providing coverage.
  • The underwriting standards that determine which loans are eligible for purchase by the GSEs, which can affect the quality of the risk insured by the mortgage insurer and the availability of mortgage loans.
  • The terms on which mortgage insurance coverage can be canceled before reaching the cancellation thresholds established by law.
  • The programs established by the GSEs intended to avoid or mitigate loss on insured mortgages and the circumstances in which mortgage servicers must implement such programs.
  • The terms that the GSEs require to be included in mortgage insurance policies for loans that they purchase, including limitations on the rescission rights of mortgage insurers.
  • The extent to which the GSEs intervene in mortgage insurers' claims paying practices, rescission practices or rescission settlement practices with lenders.
  • The maximum loan limits of the GSEs compared to those of the FHA and other investors.

The FHFA has been the conservator of the GSEs since 2008 and has the authority to control and direct their operations. The increased role that the federal government has assumed in the residential housing finance system through the GSE conservatorship may increase the likelihood that the business practices of the GSEs change, including through administrative action, in ways that have a material adverse effect on us and that the charters of the GSEs are changed by new federal legislation.

In 2019, under the prior Presidential Administration, the U.S. Treasury Department ("Treasury") released the "Treasury Housing Reform Plan" (the "Plan"). The Plan recommends administrative and legislative reforms for the housing finance system, with such reforms intended, among other things, to achieve the goals of ending the conservatorships of the GSEs. The impact of the Plan on private mortgage insurance is unclear, in part, due to the change in Presidential Administration.

The GSEs announced that loans with applications received on or after July 1, 2021 cannot be "GSE Patch" loans and must conform to a new "Qualified Mortgage" ("QM") definition. The GSE Patch had expanded the definition of QM under the Truth in Lending Act (Regulation Z) ("TILA") to include mortgages eligible to be purchased by the GSEs, even if the mortgages did not meet the debt-to-income ("DTI") ratio limit of 43% that was included in the previous QM definition. Originating a QM may provide a lender with legal protection from lawsuits that claim the lender failed to verify a borrower's ability to repay. The new QM definition continues to require lenders to consider a borrower's DTI ratio; however, it replaces the DTI ratio cap with a pricing threshold that excludes from the definition of QM a loan whose annual percentage rate ("APR") exceeds the average prime offer rate for comparable loans by 2.25 percentage points or more. Although approximately 21% of our first half 2021 NIW was on loans with DTI ratios greater than 43%, we believe less than 2% of our first half 2021 NIW was on loans whose APR exceeded the maximum to qualify as a QM.

Treasury's Plan indicated that the FHFA and the Department of Housing and Urban Development ("HUD") should develop and implement a specific understanding as to the appropriate roles and overlap between the GSEs and FHA, including with respect to the GSEs' acquisitions of high LTV ratio loans and high DTI ratio loans. In connection with the 2021 amendment to their Preferred Stock Purchase Plans, the GSEs must limit the acquisition of certain loans with multiple higher risk characteristics related to LTV, DTI and credit score, to levels indicated to be their current levels at the time of the amendment.

As a result of the matters referred to above, the 2021 change in the Presidential Administration, and the June 2021 appointment of a new Acting Director of the FHFA, it is uncertain what role the GSEs, FHA and private capital, including private mortgage insurance, will play in the residential housing finance system in the future. The timing and impact on our business of any resulting changes is uncertain. Many of the proposed changes would require Congressional action to implement and it is difficult to estimate when Congressional action would be final and how long any associated phase-in period may last.

Reinsurance may not always be available or affordable.

We have in place quota share reinsurance ("QSR") and excess of loss reinsurance ("XOL") transactions providing various amounts of coverage on 90% of our risk in force as of June 30, 2021. Our QSR transactions with unaffiliated reinsurers cover most of our insurance written from 2013 through 2022, and smaller portions of our insurance written prior to 2013 and from 2023 through 2025. The weighted average coverage percentage of our QSR transactions was 24%, based on risk in force as of June 30, 2021. Our XOL transactions at June 30, 2021 provided excess-of-loss reinsurance coverage for a portion of the risk associated with certain mortgage insurance policies having insurance coverage in force dates from July 1, 2016 through March 31, 2019 and January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020, all dates inclusive. On August 3, 2021, we entered into another XOL transaction covering the vast majority of our mortgage insurance policies having insurance coverage in force dates from January 1, 2021 through May 28, 2021. The XOL transactions were entered into with special purpose insurers that issued notes linked to the reinsurance coverage ("Insurance Linked Notes" or "ILNs"). The reinsurance transactions reduce the tail-risk associated with stress scenarios. As a result, they reduce the capital that we are required to hold to support the risk and they allow us to earn higher returns on our business than we would without them. However, reinsurance may not always be available to us or available on similar terms, the quota share reinsurance transactions subject us to counterparty credit risk, and the GSEs may change the credit they allow under the PMIERs for risk ceded under our reinsurance transactions. If we are unable to obtain reinsurance for NIW, the capital required to support our NIW will increase and our returns may decrease absent an increase in our premium rates. An increase in our premium rates may lead to a decrease in our NIW.

We are subject to comprehensive regulation and other requirements, which we may fail to satisfy.

We are subject to comprehensive regulation, including by state insurance departments. Many regulations are designed for the protection of our insured policyholders and consumers, rather than for the benefit of investors. Mortgage insurers, including MGIC, have in the past been involved in litigation and regulatory actions related to alleged violations of the anti-referral fee provisions of the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act ("RESPA"), and the notice provisions of the Fair Credit Reporting Act ("FCRA"). While these proceedings in the aggregate did not result in material liability for MGIC, there can be no assurance that the outcome of future proceedings, if any, under these laws would not have a material adverse effect on us. To the extent that we are construed to make independent credit decisions in connection with our contract underwriting activities, we also could be subject to increased regulatory requirements under the Equal Credit Opportunity Act ("ECOA"), FCRA, and other laws. Under ECOA, examination may also be made of whether a mortgage insurer's underwriting decisions have a disparate impact on persons belonging to a protected class in violation of the law.

Although their scope varies, state insurance laws generally grant broad supervisory powers to agencies or officials to examine insurance companies and enforce rules or exercise discretion affecting almost every significant aspect of the insurance business, including payment for the referral of insurance business, premium rates and discrimination in pricing, and minimum capital requirements. The increased use, by the private mortgage insurance industry, of risk-based pricing systems that establish premium rates based on more attributes than previously considered, and of algorithms, artificial intelligence and data and analytics, may lead to additional regulatory scrutiny of premium rates and of other matters such as discrimination in pricing and underwriting, data privacy and access to insurance. For more information about state capital requirements, see our risk factor titled "State capital requirements may prevent us from continuing to write new insurance on an uninterrupted basis." For information about regulation of data privacy, see our risk factor titled "We could be adversely affected if personal information on consumers that we maintain is improperly disclosed; our information technology systems are damaged or their operations are interrupted; or our automated processes do not operate as expected."  For more details about the various ways in which our subsidiaries are regulated, see "Business - Regulation" in Item 1 of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.

While we have established policies and procedures to comply with applicable laws and regulations, many such laws and regulations are complex and it is not possible to predict the eventual scope, duration or outcome of any reviews or investigations nor is it possible to predict their effect on us or the mortgage insurance industry.

If the volume of low down payment home mortgage originations declines, the amount of insurance that we write could decline.

The factors that may affect the volume of low down payment mortgage originations include the health of the U.S. economy, conditions in regional and local economies and the level of consumer confidence; restrictions on mortgage credit due to more stringent underwriting standards, liquidity issues or risk-retention and/or capital requirements affecting lenders; the level of home mortgage interest rates; housing affordability; new and existing housing availability; the rate of household formation, which is influenced, in part, by population and immigration trends; homeownership rates; the rate of home price appreciation, which in times of heavy refinancing can affect whether refinanced loans have LTV ratios that require private mortgage insurance; and government housing policy encouraging loans to first-time homebuyers. A decline in the volume of low down payment home mortgage originations could decrease demand for mortgage insurance and limit our NIW. For other factors that could decrease the demand for mortgage insurance, see our risk factor titled "The amount of insurance we write could be adversely affected if lenders and investors select alternatives to private mortgage insurance."

State capital requirements may prevent us from continuing to write new insurance on an uninterrupted basis.

The insurance laws of 16 jurisdictions, including Wisconsin, MGIC's domiciliary state, require a mortgage insurer to maintain a minimum amount of statutory capital relative to its risk in force (or a similar measure) in order for the mortgage insurer to continue to write new business. We refer to these requirements as the "State Capital Requirements." While they vary among jurisdictions, the most common State Capital Requirements allow for a maximum risk-to-capital ratio of 25 to 1. A risk-to-capital ratio will increase if (i) the percentage decrease in capital exceeds the percentage decrease in insured risk, or (ii) the percentage increase in capital is less than the percentage increase in insured risk. Wisconsin does not regulate capital by using a risk-to-capital measure but instead requires a minimum policyholder position ("MPP"). The "policyholder position" of a mortgage insurer is its net worth or surplus, contingency reserve and a portion of the reserves for unearned premiums.

At June 30, 2021 MGIC's risk-to-capital ratio was 8.9 to 1, below the maximum allowed by the jurisdictions with State Capital Requirements, and its policyholder position was $3.5 billion above the required MPP of $1.7 billion. At June 30, 2021, the risk-to-capital ratio of our combined insurance operations was 8.9 to 1. Our risk-to-capital ratio and MPP reflect full credit for the risk ceded under our quota share reinsurance and excess of loss transactions with unaffiliated reinsurers. It is possible that under the revised State Capital Requirements discussed below, MGIC will not be allowed full credit for the risk ceded under such transactions. If MGIC is not allowed an agreed level of credit under the State Capital Requirements, MGIC may terminate the reinsurance transactions, without penalty.

The NAIC previously announced plans to revise the State Capital Requirements that are provided for in its Mortgage Guaranty Insurance Model Act. In December 2019, a working group of state regulators released an exposure draft of a revised Mortgage Guaranty Insurance Model Act and a risk-based capital framework to establish capital requirements for mortgage insurers, although no date has been established by which the NAIC must propose revisions to the capital requirements and certain items have not yet been completely addressed by the framework, including the treatment of ceded risk and minimum capital floors. Currently we believe that the PMIERs contain more restrictive capital requirements than the draft Mortgage Guaranty Insurance Model Act in most circumstances.

While MGIC currently meets the State Capital Requirements of Wisconsin and all other jurisdictions, it could be prevented from writing new business in the future in all jurisdictions if it fails to meet the State Capital Requirements of Wisconsin, or it could be prevented from writing new business in a particular jurisdiction if it fails to meet the State Capital Requirements of that jurisdiction, and in each case if MGIC does not obtain a waiver of such requirements. It is possible that regulatory action by one or more jurisdictions, including those that do not have specific State Capital Requirements, may prevent MGIC from continuing to write new insurance in such jurisdictions. If we are unable to write business in a particular jurisdiction, lenders may be unwilling to procure insurance from us anywhere. In addition, a lender's assessment of the future ability of our insurance operations to meet the State Capital Requirements or the PMIERs may affect its willingness to procure insurance from us. In this regard, see our risk factor titled "Competition or changes in our relationships with our customers could reduce our revenues, reduce our premium yields and/or increase our losses." A possible future failure by MGIC to meet the State Capital Requirements or the PMIERs will not necessarily mean that MGIC lacks sufficient resources to pay claims on its insurance liabilities. You should read the rest of these risk factors for information about matters that could negatively affect MGIC's compliance with State Capital Requirements and its claims paying resources, including the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

We are susceptible to disruptions in the servicing of mortgage loans that we insure and we rely on third-party reporting for information regarding the mortgage loans we insure.

We depend on reliable, consistent third-party servicing of the loans that we insure. An increase in delinquent loans, including as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, may result in liquidity issues and operational burdens for servicers. When a mortgage loan that is collateral for a mortgage backed security ("MBS") becomes delinquent, the servicer is usually required to continue to pay principal and interest to the MBS investors, generally for four months, even though the servicer is not receiving payments from borrowers. This may cause liquidity issues for especially non-bank servicers (who service approximately 44% of the loans underlying our insurance in force as of June 30, 2021) because they do not have the same sources of liquidity that bank servicers have.

While there has been no disruption in our premium receipts through the end of June 2021, servicers who experience future liquidity issues may be less likely to advance premiums to us on policies covering delinquent loans or to remit premiums on policies covering loans that are not delinquent. Our policies allow us to cancel coverage on loans that are not delinquent if the premiums are not paid within a grace period. However, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many states have enacted moratoriums on the cancellation of insurance due to non-payment. The specific provisions of the moratoriums vary from state-to-state. In addition, the GSEs have the option to reinstate coverage by payment of the applicable premium within 30 days after notifying us of their intention to reinstate the cancelled coverage.

A future increase in delinquent loans caused by the COVID-19 pandemic or other factors, as well as the possible transfer of servicing resulting from liquidity issues, may increase the operational burden on servicers, cause a disruption in the servicing of delinquent loans and reduce servicers' abilities to undertake mitigation efforts that could help limit our losses.

The information presented in this report and on our website with respect to the mortgage loans we insure is based on information reported to us by third parties, including the servicers and originators of the mortgage loans, and information presented may be subject to lapses or inaccuracies in reporting from such third parties. In many cases, we may not be aware that information reported to us is incorrect until such time as a claim is made against us under the relevant insurance policy. We do not receive monthly information from servicers for single premium policies, and may not be aware that the mortgage loans insured by such policies have been repaid. We periodically attempt to determine if coverage is still in force on such policies by asking the last servicer of record or through the periodic reconciliation of loan information with certain servicers. It may be possible that our reports continue to reflect, as active, policies on mortgage loans that have been repaid.

Changes in interest rates, house prices or mortgage insurance cancellation requirements may change the length of time that our policies remain in force.

The premium from a single premium policy is collected upfront and generally earned over the estimated life of the policy. In contrast, premiums from a monthly premium policy are received and earned each month over the life of the policy. In each year, most of our premiums earned are from insurance that has been written in prior years. As a result, the length of time insurance remains in force, which is generally measured by persistency (the percentage of our insurance remaining in force from one year prior), is a significant determinant of our revenues. A higher than expected persistency rate may decrease the profitability from single premium policies because they will remain in force longer and may increase the incidence of claims than was estimated when the policies were written. A low persistency rate on monthly premium policies will reduce future premiums but may also reduce the incidence of claims, while a high persistency on those policies will increase future premiums but may increase the incidence of claims.

Our persistency rate was 57.1% at June 30, 2021, 60.5% at December 31, 2020 and 75.8% at December 31, 2019. Since 2000, our year-end persistency ranged from a high of 84.7% at December 31, 2009 to a low of 47.1% at December 31, 2003. Our persistency rate is primarily affected by the level of current mortgage interest rates compared to the mortgage coupon rates on our insurance in force, which affects the vulnerability of the insurance in force to refinancing; and the current amount of equity that borrowers have in the homes underlying our insurance in force. Borrowers with significant equity may be able to refinance their loans without requiring mortgage insurance. In addition, the Homeowners Protection Act ("HOPA") requires servicers to cancel mortgage insurance when a borrower's LTV ratio